Us-news

DWP could award people living with long-Covid £608 every month in PIP support

People across the UK can now make a claim for financial support through the Personal Independence Payment (PIP) to help with the additional costs of living with long-Covid symptoms.

PIP is a benefit delivered by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) and helps cover the extra costs you may face if you need help with daily tasks or moving around outside your home. The latest figures from the DWP show that by April 2021, there were 2,705,857 people across the nation claiming PIP for a long-term illness, disability or mental health condition – including 288,135 Scots.

However, included in those statistics are 20 claimants from England and Wales who are now receiving PIP with long-Covid attributed as their main disabling condition.

While there are currently no Scottish claimants receiving the benefit for this condition, these low figures are from April and given the current backlog of disability benefit assessments, this number could increase when the next set of statistics are released.

However, it could also indicate that people are simply not aware that they may qualify for PIP if they are living with long-Covid and be eligible for between £23.70 and £152.15 every week in support – PIP is paid every four weeks, so this amounts to between £94.80 and £608.60 each month.

Although the condition is classified by the DWP as ‘Coronavirus COVID-19’, DWP minister Justin Tomlinson recently confirmed that: “Due to the nature of the qualifying period for PIP claims, these cases will all be ‘long COVID’ or ‘post-COVID syndrome’ cases rather than initial COVID-19 infections.”

He continued: “Any individuals with long COVID-19 as their primary reason for claiming PIP prior to March 2021 will not be classified as ‘Coronavirus COVID-19’.”

He explained how these cases will remain classified according to the main disabling condition identified at the time, for example, respiratory illness, fatigue, etc.

As of April 2021, the DWP figures show there have been:

  • 14 claimants awarded PIP in England for Coronavirus COVID-19
  • 6 claimants awarded PIP in Wales for Coronavirus COVID-19
  • 0 claimants awarded PIP InScotland for Coronavirus COVID-19

It’s worth noting these statistics may change as more claims are assessed.

However, the key thing to understand is that if you have been affected solely by long-Covid, or if long-Covid has made an existing condition worse, then you could be entitled to PIP if you have never claimed before or an enhanced payment rate if you are an existing claimant.

And you do not need a formal diagnosis of long-Covid, or even to show that your initial Covid infection was severe, in order to claim.

Assessors and decision makers are told that “NICE Guidelines indicate there is no correlation between the severity of initial infection and the likelihood of experiencing long-Covid”.

Which means that even people who had a very mild initial infection may be eligible for PIP if their condition deteriorates.

It may also be the case where claimants do not have to show that they have had a positive test result.

DWP staff are told : “Claimants do not have to have had a positive test result to be diagnosed with the syndrome; we have to remember that testing has not always been easily available”

Find out if you can claim PIP by looking at the criteria set out by the DWP below.

What are the long-term effects of coronavirus?

The NHS website states: “For some people, coronavirus (Covid-19) can cause symptoms that last weeks or months after the infection has gone. This is sometimes called post-Covid-19 syndrome or ‘long-Covid’.”

About long COVID

How long it takes to recover from Covid-19 is different for everybody.

Many people feel better in a few days or weeks and most will make a full recovery within 12 weeks, but for some people, symptoms can last longer.

The chances of having long-term symptoms does not seem to be linked to how ill you are when you first get Covid-19. People who had mild symptoms at first can still have long-term problems.

In April, the latest PIP figures showed 20 people across the UK are claiming PIP for long-Covid

Symptoms of long-Covid

There are lots of symptoms you can have after a Covid-19 infection.

Common long COVID symptoms include:

  • extreme tiredness (fatigue)
  • shortness of breath
  • chest pain or tightness
  • problems with memory and concentration (‘brain fog’)
  • difficulty sleeping (insomnia)
  • heart palpitations
  • dizziness
  • pins and needles
  • joint pain
  • depression and anxiety
  • tinnitus, earaches
  • feeling sick, diarrhoea, stomach aches, loss of appetite
  • a high temperature, cough, headaches, sore throat, changes to sense of smell or taste
  • Rashes

Who is eligible for PIP?

You do not need to have worked or paid National Insurance contributions to qualify for PIP, and it does not matter what your income is, if you have any savings or if you’re in or out of work – or on furlough.

You must also have a health condition or disability where you:

The DWP will judge the eligibility of your PIP claim on a period of 12 months, looking back for three months and forward for nine months – they must consider if your illness changes over time.

You usually need to have lived in Scotland for at least two of the last three years and be in the country when you apply.

PIP daily living and mobility test

If you get or need help with any of the following because of your condition, you should consider applying for PIP:

  • preparing, cooking or eating food

  • managing your medication

  • washing, bathing or using the toilet

  • dressing and undressing

  • engaging and communicating with other people

  • reading and understanding written information

  • making decisions about money

  • planning a journey or following a route

  • moving around – outside the home

What is classified as ‘help’ for a PIP claim

You are classified as needing help to do an activity if you need a person or a device to:

You may also be classified as needing help if you do an activity yourself but:

Help Claiming PIP from DWP

PIP test scoring criteria

The PIP scoring criteria awards points for a statement which applies to you for each activity

The DWP will decide which statement best fits your situation most of the time. You will get a set amount of points ranging from 0 -12 for each activity.

The total number of points you get for each group of activities will decide whether you are entitled to PIP, and how much money you will receive.

To get the standard rate daily living component, you need to score between 8 to 11 points in total for the daily living activities. You need 12 points to get the enhanced rate.

To get the standard rate mobility component, you need to score between 8 to 11 points in total for the mobility activities. You need 12 points to get the enhanced rate.

How is PIP paid?

PIP is usually paid every four weeks unless you are terminally ill, in which case it is paid every week.

PIP will be paid directly into your bank, building society or credit union account.

What are the PIP payment rates for 2021/22?

PIP is made up of two components – daily living and mobility.

Whether you get one or both of these and how much depends on how severely your condition affects you.

You could receive the following amounts per week depending on your circumstances:

Daily living

  • Standard rate – £60.00

  • Enhanced rate – £89.60

Mobility

  • Standard rate – £23.70

  • Enhanced rate – £62.55

How you are assessed

You will be assessed by an independent healthcare professional to help the DWP work out the level of help you need.

Face-to-face assessments have now restarted and will be offered alongside telephone and video based assessments. All assessments will follow strict public health guidelines and put the safety of the claimant first – we have a full guide on how to prepare for assessments here.

DWP could award people living with long-Covid £608 every month in PIP support

Did you know there are a number of ways you can stay up to date with the latest money saving and benefits news from the Daily Record?

You can join the conversation on our Money Saving Scotland Facebook group for money-saving tips, benefits news, consumer help and advice plus the latest shopping deals.

Sign up to our weekly Record Money newsletter to get our best stories sent straight to your inbox. You can sign up either by entering your email address in the sign up box further up this page or click here.

You can also follow our Twitter account @Recordmoney_ for regular updates here.

How do you make a claim for PIP?

You can make a new claim by contacting the DWP, you’ll find all the information you need to apply on the gov.uk website here.

Before you call, you’ll need:

  • your contact details, for example telephone number

  • your date of birth

  • your National Insurance number – this is on letters about tax, pensions and benefits

  • your bank or building society account number and sort code

  • your doctor or health worker’s name, address and telephone number

  • dates and addresses for any time you’ve spent abroad, in a care home or hospital

Once you have contacted the DWP, they will send you a document to complete which consists of 14 questions and a section for any additional information.

The questions focus on how your condition affects you – put as much relevant detail in as you can to help the assessor understand your physical and mental health needs.

If you have difficulty filling in your form or understanding the questions, contact your local council and ask for help or Citizens Advice Scotland.

We have a breakdown of all 14 questions here and you can take an anonymous self-test online at Benefits and Work to see how many points you would be awarded for each response.

For more information about PIP, visit GOV.UK here.

Get the latest money-saving and benefits news sent straight to your inbox. Sign up to our weekly Money newsletterhere.



Most Related Links :
todayuknews Governmental News Finance News

Source link

Back to top button
Native News Post