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Dell is BANNED from selling its powerful gaming PCs in California

Dell is BANNED from selling its powerful gaming PCs in California because it consumes more energy than the liberal state’s energy laws allow

  • Dell is banned from selling its new Alienware gaming system in California
  •  This includes the three The Alienware Aurora R12 Gaming Desktop systems with the 11th Gen Intel Core Processor
  • Dell’s Alienware consumes 63 kWH a year when idle, but it can use 563 kWh when the CPU is stressed 
  • California law restricts anything made after July 1 to 50, 60 or 70 kWH a year 

Computer maker Dell has been banned from shipping its gaming system, Alienware, to customers in California due to power consumption regulations,’ the company’s website reads.

The Alienware Aurora R12 Gaming Desktop without the 11th Gen Intel Core Processor is the only model that can be shipped to all 50 states, the other three systems with the powerful chip, which range in price for $1,099 to $2,409.99, cannot.

According to Dell, its energy intensive Alienware consumes 63 kWH a year when idle, but it can use 563 kWh when the CPU is stressed.

California law restricts anything made after July 1 to 50, 60 or 70 kWH a year. 

California is not the only US state stopping the gaming system from breaching its borders, as Colorado, Hawaii, Oregon, Vermont and Washington have also prohibited it, as first reported on by The Register.

The Alienware Aurora R12 Gaming Desktop without the 11th Gen Intel Core Processor is the only model that can be shipped to all 50 states, the other three systems with the powerful chip, which range in price for $1,099 to $2,409.99, cannot

California passed new energy restrictions on consumer goods in 2016, but the standards did not take effect until 2019.

The restrictions stem from the idea that California is the most populous state in the nation, has the largest economy, and is second only to Texas in total energy consumption.

According to the US Energy Information Administration, the state ‘is the fourth-largest electricity producer in the nation and accounted for about five percent of US utility-scale (1-megawatt and larger) electricity net generation in 2019.’

With these details in mind, California officials began releasing a different list of restrictions every few years with Tier I restrictions  rolling out January 2019, which allowed no more than 50, 80 or 100 kWh a year for systems made from then up until July 2021.

According to Dell, its energy intensive Alienware consumes 63 kWH a year when idle, but it can use 563 kWh when the CPU is stressed. California law restricts anything made after July 1 to 50, 60 or 70 kWH a year

According to Dell, its energy intensive Alienware consumes 63 kWH a year when idle, but it can use 563 kWh when the CPU is stressed. California law restricts anything made after July 1 to 50, 60 or 70 kWH a year

And Tier II launched just this past July 1, which includes Dell’s Alienware gaming system.

There is now a warning label under the gaming systems on Dell’s website that reads: ‘This product cannot be shipped to the states of California, Colorado, Hawaii, Oregon, Vermont or Washington due to power consumption regulations adopted by those states.

‘Any orders placed that are bound for those states will be canceled.’

A California Energy Commission (CEC) spokesperson told The Register that staff was unaware of vendors not shipping to California as a result of the Tier II requirements taking effect.

‘This was driven by the CEC Tier 2 implementation that defined a mandatory energy efficiency standard for PCs – including desktops, AIOs and mobile gaming systems,’ Dell told Motherboard in an email.

‘To be sold or offered for sale in California manufacturers must test products at a CEC-approved laboratory and receive third-party certification.

‘Once certified, manufacturers are required to submit their documentation and data to the CEC to be uploaded into the agency’s online [database].’

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