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UK Covid deaths soar 26% in a week as another 72 die despite cases dropping

The UK has recorded another 39,962 Covid cases in the latest 24 hour period, while deaths have risen by 72

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Coronavirus: Vaccines alone ‘not enough’ to stop spread says Finn

The UK has recorded another 39,962 Covid cases in the latest 24 hour period, while deaths have risen by 72 – up by over a quarter in seven days.

It breaks a cycle of 11 consecutive days in a row where new infections remained above 40,000 across Britain amid fears of a fresh wave as winter approaches.

The figures, released this afternoon by the Department of Health, see an 11 percent case decrease compared to last Sunday (October 17) when there were 44,985 recorded.

And 57 fatalities within 28 days of a positive test, meaning a rise of 26 percent.

Daily hospital admissions also continue to surge with 1,080 today and 6,720 over the last week and 1,116 in seven days which works out at a 19.9 percent increase.

Yesterday, cases rose by 44,985 with a further 135 fatalities.



Covid infections in the UK continue to rise
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Image:

PA)




It comes as officials are considering an ‘immediate’ rollout of Plan B Covid-19 restrictions, according to reports of a leaked memo.

The email was sent from the UK Health Security Agency to local council leaders and directors of Public Health late last week, it is claimed.

The alleged document outlines a string of measures that could be introduced under a ‘Plan B’ – including working from home, vaccine passports for nightclubs, and the return of legally mandated face masks.



Health Secretary Sajid Javid
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Image:

POOL/AFP via Getty Images)




Just days earlier, Health Secretary Sajid Javid had refused to trigger Plan B, despite a rise in infections.

He told a No10 press conference it was right to hold back because pressure on the NHS isn’t “unsustainable” yet.

Meanwhile, a rare syndrome has been added to the list of possible side effects from the AstraZaneca vaccine by a UK health regulator.

Guillain-Barre syndrome is a condition that has been noted in some people that have had the Oxford jab, although experts insist the benefits outweigh any possible issues.



A sign in Bolton warning people Covid has not gone away
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Image:

Daily Mirror/Andy Stenning)




The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) has added Guillain-Barre syndrome as a possible side effect of the vaccine.

The disorder affects the nerves mainly in the feet, hands and limbs, states the NHS.

Numbness, pain or weakness can all be felt in patients with the condition which affects the immune system.



Brits are being urged to have their Covid booster jab
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Image:

Derby Telegraph)




For most people they will be treated and have a complete recovery but on rare occasions it can to lead to long term illness and may even be life-threatening.

As also reported today, the UK’s most senior NHS doctor has urged Brits eligible for Covid-19 booster jabs to ‘take up the offer.’

Professor Stephen Powis, the medical director of NHS England, said “the freedom we now all enjoy” is a direct result of the willingness of patients to come forward for jabs.







His warning that the country is at a “crunch point” comes amid concern in government over the speed of the booster rollout, as well as rising hospitalisations.

Professor Powis wrote in the Sunday Telegraph: “To maximise the impact of the vaccination programme we must all continue to act responsibly.

“The more of us that come forward for our booster jab, and the more we keep our resolve in helping to limit the spread of infection, then the greater chance we all have of staying well.”


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